A list of taxa from Evolutionary Classification sorted by hierarchal order.

  • Laboratorius; c. BT 523; encompasses all organisms, created for autonomous work.
    • Plants; c. BT 523; organisms which cannot move without external forces.
      • Aseminifer; c. BT 523; plants which reproduce asexually.
        • Fragmentus; c. BT 523; asexual plants which reproduce by means of breaking into two separate parts.
          • Algae; c. BT 523; fragmentative plants characterized by their rudimentary forms, lacking roots and leaves.
          • Worts; c. BT 506; fragmentative plants characterized by their low sprawling leaf patterns.
            • Leafless Worts; c. BT 505; worts characterized by their lack of leaf structures.
              • Mossworts; c. BT 505; leafless worts characterized by their flat hair-like growth.
              • Scaleworts; c. BT 505; leafless worts characterized by their long wavy scale-like growth.
            • Leaved Worts; c. BT 505; worts characterized by their leafy structures.
        • Propagatus; c. BT 503; asexual plants which reproduce by means of growth and fragmentation.
          • Firmoss; c. BT 503; propagative plants characterized by typically low sprawling stemmed growths.
            • Bulbmoss; c. BT 503; firmoss characterized by the large bulbs at the base of their stems.
            • Scalemoss; c. BT 500; firmoss characterized by the scale-like leaves which divulge from their stems.
            • Spearmoss; c. BT 496; firmoss characterized by their superficial spear-like shapes.
          • Tree-like Moss; c. BT 493; propagative plants characterized by their tough tall stems and tree-like branches.
            • Horsetail; c. BT 493; tree-like mosses characterized by their tall hardy stems with radiating branches.
            • Shrubmoss; c. BT 492; tree-like mosses characterized by their low-to-ground erratic growth pattern.
      • Seminifer; c. BT 484; plants which reproduce sexually.
        • Sporifer; c. BT 484; plants which reproduce by spores.
          • Fungus; c. BT 484; spore-producing soft fleshy carnivorous plants.
            • Mold; c. BT 484; fungus which grow in fuzzy flat blankets.
              • Water Mold; c. BT 484; molds which grow in wet and humid environments.
              • Dry Mold; c. BT 481; molds which can grow in typically dry environments.
            • Yeast; c. BT 480; fungus which grow as single celled organisms but exhibit multicellular behavior.
              • Single-celled Yeast; c. BT 480; yeasts which live their lives as entirely single-celled organisms.
              • Multicellular Yeast; c. BT 478; yeasts which through any part of their life cycle may work as a multicellular organism.
            • Mushroom; c. BT 479; fungus which grow fruiting bodies above the surface.
          • Fern; c. BT 483; spore-producing plants which do not present woody growths.
            • Fiddlehead Ferns; c. BT 484; ground ferns characterized by their unfurling leaves and stems.
            • Furl-less Ferns; c. BT 483; ground ferns which do not unfurl like fiddleheads.
          • Woody Fern; c. BT 481; spore-producing plants which present woody growths.
            • Fleshy Woody Ferns; c. BT 481; woody ferns characterized by their lack of scaly bark-like texture on their woody growths.
            • Scaly Woody Ferns; c. BT 475; woody ferns characterized by their scaly wooded growths.
        • Florifer; c. BT 471; plants which reproduce by flowering.
          • Conifers; c. BT 471; florifers which produce seed-bearing cones from their flowering organs.
            • Pines; c. BT 471; conifers differentiated by their thick spirally arranged woody cones.
            • Pods; c. BT 470; conifers differentiated by their highly specialized, often fleshy, cones.
            • Cypress; c. BT 464; conifers differentiated by their leathery, sometimes fleshy, cones.
            • Nutty Conifers; c. BT 462; conifers differentiated by their woody, nut-like, cones.
            • Yews; c. BT 460; conifers differentiated by the fleshy, almost fruit-like, leaves which develop around their cones.
          • Fruiting Plants; c. BT 462; florifers which produce true flowers which mature to bear true fruits.
            • Aquatic Fruits; c. BT 462; fruiting plants which are entirely or partially aquatic.
            • Woody Fruits; c. BT 460; fruiting woody plants.
            • Apetalous; c. BT 455; fruiting plants which do not produce petals around their flowers.
            • Grasses; c. BT 451; fruiting plants which may be differentiated by their singular leaf during germination.
            • Eudicots; c. BT 448; fruiting plants which may be differentiated by their two germinating leaves.
    • Animals; c. BT 498; organisms which can move by means of complex musculature.
      • Vermin; c. BT 498; animals which lack an internal skeletal structure.
        • Worms; c. BT 498; vermin which lack any notable manipulable external limbs.
          • Shell-less Worms; c. BT 498; worms which lack an external carapace.
            • Earthworm; c. BT 498;
            • Slug; c. BT 493;
          • Shelled Worms; c. BT 497; worms which have an external carapace.
            • Walking Worm; c. BT 497;
            • Snail; c. BT 493;
        • Bivalves; c. BT 497; vermin which consist of a two-part shell hinged on one end by muscle.
        • Cephalopods; c. BT 498; vermin which share in common a radial pattern of manipulable tentacles around a single beak.
          • Nautiloids; c. BT 498; shelled cephalopods with a diverse range of morphology.
          • Soft-bodied Cephalopods; c. BT 496; cephalopods which lack external shells.
            • Decapods; c. BT 496; soft-bodied cephalopods with ten-limbs which maintain a shell as an internal organ.
              • Cuttlefish; c. BT 496; decapods which maintain their shell in the form of a cuttlebone.
              • Squid; c. BT 497; decapods which maintain their shell in the form of a pen.
            • Octopus; c. BT 485; soft-bodied cephalopods with eight limbs which lack any form of shell structure.
        • Arthropod; c. BT 497; vermin which have a body covered entirely with an external skeletal system.
          • Crustacea; c. BT 497; arthropods with biramous appendages.
            • Copepod; c. BT 497;
            • Shrimp; c. BT 495;
            • Crab; c. BT 494;
            • Lobster; c. BT 491;
          • Hexapod; c. BT 496; arthropods with uniramous appendages.
      • Fish; c. BT 495; animals commonly characterized by their entirely aquatic lifestyles.
        • Cartilaginous Fish; c. BT 495; fish lacking true bones which possess tooth-like scales.
          • Rays; c. BT 495;
            • Shovelnose Rays; c. BT 495;
            • Stingrays; c. BT 493;
            • Electric Rays; c. BT 489;
          • Sharks; c. BT 492;
            • Ground Sharks; c. BT 492;
            • Mackerel Sharks; c. BT 486;
            • Squaliform Sharks; c. BT 482;
        • Jawless Fish; c. BT 490; fish lacking paired fins and true jaws.
          • Armored Jawless Fish; c. BT 490;
          • Jawless Eels; c. BT 485;
            • Conodont; c. BT 485;
            • Hagfish; c. BT 482;
            • Lamprey; c. BT 478;
        • Bony Fish; c. BT 487; fish which have true bones and scales.
          • Ray-finned Fish; c. BT 487;
            • Partially-Ossified Fish; c. BT 487;
              • Sturgeon; c. BT 487;
              • Paddlefish; c. BT 483;
              • Gar; c. BT 481;
              • Bowfin; c. BT 478;
            • Ossified Fish; c. BT 482;
              • Bony Eels; c. BT 482;
              • Soft-finned Fish; c. BT 480;
              • Spiny-finned Fish; c. BT 473;
          • Lobe-finned Fish; c. BT 478;
            • Coelacanths; c. BT 478;
            • Lungfish; c. BT 474;
      • Amphibia; c. BT 489; animals which often undergo metamorphosis, require moist skin to breathe.
        • Frogs; c. BT 489; characterized by their powerful hind limbs.
        • Salamanders; c. BT 489; characterized by their slender long bodies.
        • Mega-Amphibia; c. BT 484; large carnivorous active amphibians whose metamorphosis is more direct.
      • Synapsids; c. BT 475; typically terrestrial animals with uniquely adapted placenta.
        • Reptilia; c. BT 475; synapsids which lay shelled eggs.
          • Squamata; c. BT 475; reptiles characterized by their slender elongated bodies.
          • Turtles; c. BT 469; reptiles distinguished by their highly developed shell-like backs.
            • Soft-shelled Turtles; c. BT ;
            • Hard-shelled Turtles; c. BT ;
              • Freshwater Turtles; c. BT ;
              • Saltwater Turtles; c. BT ;
          • Archosaurs; c. BT 468; reptiles distinguished by their pelvic bones.
            • Aves; c. BT 468; feathered archosaurs, often capable of powered flight.
            • Crocodylomorphs; c. BT 468; non-avian primarily semi-aquatic scaly archosaurs.
        • Mammalia; c. BT 462; distinguished by the presence of mammary glands, which produce milk to nourish young
          • Egg-laying Mammals; c. BT 462; mammals which lay eggs instead of giving live birth.
          • Marsupial; c. BT 460; mammals which give birth to undeveloped young, which are nurtured in pouches.
            • Marsupial Bears; c. BT 460; marsupials with characteristically carnivoran-like body plans.
            • Marsupial Shrews; c. BT 454; marsupials with characteristically rodent-like body plans.
          • Placentalia; c. BT 459; mammals which give birth to fully nourished offspring.
            • Rodents; c. BT 459; Often small fingered mammals with diverse ecological roles.
              • Shrews; c. BT 459; small insectivorous terrestrial rodents.
              • Moles; c. BT 458; rodents with large claws, often for subterraneous digging.
              • Lagomorphs; c. BT 456; rodentia whose incisors continuously grow.
              • Armored Mammals; c. BT 452; rodents with prominent armor-like coverings.
              • Primates; c. BT 449; rodentia with apposable thumbs.
              • Bats; c. BT 440; rodents whose hands have become wings.
            • Carnivora; c. BT 453; mammals with primarily carnivorous diets and diverse hunting practices.
              • Caniforms; c. BT 453; carnivora with nonretractable claws.
              • Feliforms; c. BT 451; carnivora with retractable claws.
              • Cetacea; c. BT 442; often large mammals adapted for marine environments.
            • Ungulates; c. BT 452; mammals with hooves.

See Also